The $9 Leather sheath: Quick, easy, and actually good!

So today I finally went for it and made a leather sheath for my Sykco Dog Soldier.

Making a leather sheath is something I’ve wanted to do for many years. Seemed simple enough yet when watching tutorials and looking at all the stuff needed for leather work, the techniques, time… it kind of gets overwhelming.

Well, today I just went for it. Did a sheath the most simple, straight forward way possible. I expected very little given the basic method and tools used yet I couldn’t be happier with the results. Yes, I bought a cheap leather tool kit but didn’t use any of it, other than some of the waxed thread.

All you really need for this project is some thick leather, 2 or 3mm thick. I got some buffalo leather. It was 9 bucks shipped and the colour was pretty 🙂 .

Keep in mind this isnt by any stretch of the imagination the correct way of doing this. Its more of a redneck/ Jerry-rigged approach to it.

1)You should make a paper template although to be honest I didn’t bother and marked on the piece of leather the shape of the blade. Buy one that is at least 4 cm wider than the knife itself. Mark up to what point you want the sheath to cover the blade and where you want the belt loop to end up. I just did the best I could with the piece of leather I had, given that I use rather wide, riggers shooting belts daily in my pants. Leave about 5mm for the welt, meaning the piece of leather that goes between the two layers.

2)With the knife wrapped in plastic film, I placed the other piece of leather under the faucet and got it soaking wet. Once softened I placed it on top of the knife and moulded it with my fingers and using a spoon to mark the curvature of the grip. I gave it about 10mm overlapping the grip, over the choil and the finger guard so as to hold the knife in place. This would save me from having to use any snap buttons which I didn’t have.  I also placed a hair dryer and left it pointing towards the formed leather for it to dry up and harden.

3) On the bottom leather piece, the one I draw the shape of the blade, I soaked a bit the top section of leather that folds to form the belt loop and kept it down in place with a couple clips. I also used some sand paper on the section I would later glue and sew, so that the leather glue got a better grip on the surface. Once glued I kept it in place for a few minutes until it dried, then used an electric drill to drill a few holes with the smallest drill bit I had. I didn’t use any fancy stitches, just made an eight figure knot to keep the end of the thread in place, passed the thread to the end and then back on the same holes. I know this isnt the way you’re supposed to do it but oh well.

4)Now that I had my belt loop ready, I glued the welt to the bottom piece (sandpaper on the area before the glue), then glued the top one with the knife form on top of it and kept the three players in place with several clips. Before gluing check if the knife fits just keeping the pieces in place with the clips. This should give you somewhat of an idea of how it fits. Once glued and with the clips keeping everything in place I let it try for another 15 minutes or so.

5)Now I drill the holes along the edges, leaving a drain hole at the bottom of the sheath. I measure four lengths of thread per side of the sheath and sew all the way, then back the other way using the same holes. You’re supposed to use a technique using two needles but I just did it this way making sure everything was nice and tight. When I was done I hammered the thread to flatten the stitches.

6) I used a Dremel to sand down the sides, then using the hair dryer and some beeswax I worked the sides of the sheath, rolling a wooden handle to even and flatten the sides of the leather sheath. The wax presses and flattens the leather, keeping it from coming apart.

And that’s it. Not the best most sophisticated way of making a leather sheath but its cheap and relatively fast. Give it a try!

Fernando “FerFAL” Aguirre is the author of “The Modern Survival Manual: Surviving the Economic Collapse” and “Bugging Out and Relocating: When Staying is not an Option”

More questions about Bitcoin

Message:

Hello, Fernando. I was wondering more & more about Bitcoin, but I can’t find too much clear information about it- everything starts in the middle & doesn’t seem too concerned about telling you how not to get snagged-up with it (ex: looking like a drug dealer or a money launderer). Would you people tell me some more about it? I would hate to miss a good investment, but I don’t even get how it IS an investment- it doesn’t seem like there’s any company that distributes it, so how can there be any stock? And why not just make your own?

A-

Hello A,

Again, I’m no Bitcoin expert by any stretch of the imagination but I’ll try to answer some of your questions.

Bitcoin is a currency, a virtual one at that but some Bitcoin does not make you a drug dealer any more than having a roll of 20s in your pocket makes you one. Don’t let the mainstream media agenda intended to stigmatize Bitcoin get to you. In any case, ALL large financial groups are into Bitcoin at this point, so don’t feel bad about doing it yourself.

Second, it is not an investment. Investments generate profit. Buying Bitcoin will only get you… Bitcoin. Like gold, it can go up or down and you selling at the right time may leave you with a profit but it’s a currency, not an investment.

Finally, you CAN make your own. You can mine Bitcoin with your computer. The problem is that by its own nature Bitcoin is HARD to mine, meaning you need a lot of computer power to mine it so that its profitable and compensates the electric power you are using to generate it. People used to buy mining computers to mine Bitcoin and many still do. How profitable it is today is hard to say. All I know is that you need some initial investment for the mining computers and electric power better be rather affordable where you are.

As I said before, I think Bitcoin is extremely interesting but it’s not on the same line as gold and silver, which have been around for thousands of years. Can it be the gold of the future generation? Maybe, but don’t put into it anything you can’t afford to lose. That would be my advice.

As for buying Bitcoins, I suggest you do a lot of google and reading first. Chances are you’ll end up in Coinbase or maybe Localbitcoins. No, I don’t have any association of any kind with either one, they are just some of the most common names that pop up.

Good luck!

FerFAL

Fernando “FerFAL” Aguirre is the author of “The Modern Survival Manual: Surviving the Economic Collapse” and “Bugging Out and Relocating: When Staying is not an Option”

Steve’s Pages: Manuals for Every Firearm

Steve’s pages is famous but well worth remembering. A ton of good info, gun manuals but also many manuals for optics.

http://stevespages.com/page7b.htm

Download any manuals you may be missing for some of the guns you own.

FerFAL

Fernando “FerFAL” Aguirre is the author of “The Modern Survival Manual: Surviving the Economic Collapse” and “Bugging Out and Relocating: When Staying is not an Option”

Where to buy Bitcoin?

Ferfal,

I just saw your bitcoin article and have been looking into it.  Can you explain who exactly you use to set this up/the easiest process as it seems to be sort of complicated for the average guy.  I assume I open an account with a bitcoin broker, link a normal bank account, buy bitcoin, and hold in their “wallet”.  Is there a company you use/recommend?

A-

.

Let me say this first, I’m no Bitcoin expert.

I understand enough to believe it has potential, maybe even great potential, but please by all means do a lot of research and make up your own opinion. Wikipedia is actually a good place to start. Google it and read up some of the many good articles out there about Bitcoin and Cryptocurrencies in general.

Long story short for those looking for a straight answer would be that after looking up and checking safe places to buy, in general they will point towards Coinbase as one of the most reputable places to buy and keep an account in. Again, I’m no expert. I’m not affiliated in any way to that site and it’s not the only place for buying Bitcoin. Remember, only spend what you can afford to lose.

Good luck!

FerFAL

Fernando “FerFAL” Aguirre is the author of “The Modern Survival Manual: Surviving the Economic Collapse” and “Bugging Out and Relocating: When Staying is not an Option”

Survival Finances: So, did you buy Bitcoin when I told you to do so?

No? That’s ok. There’s still time.

I try to be very careful with my advice. You don’t see me telling people to run for the hills (or relocate to areas where a real estate broker friend of mine will sell you property and giving me a cut) When I firmly recommend a product, it’s because I truly believe it’s worth it.

Now from a practical survival perspective, Bitcoin is a powerful tool. Not in theory, not in the future. Today, bitcoin is used in places like Venezuela, where the entire society has basically collapsed into a nightmare of inflation, crime and corruption, ran by a dictator. If in that environment people find Bitcoin useful, then its empirical information, not theory.

I like empirical. Its not supposing, guesses or assumptions, it’s observation of facts.

A few weeks ago I did that thing I rarely do and gave actual financial advice by saying “some precious metals, investing in reliable stocks, investing in good real estate. And yes, putting some money in Bitcoin.” If you did put a few bucks in that Bitcoin basket back then, Bitcoin was around $3.400… Today its worth  $7.300.

As I said back then. Bitcoin is just one more tool to work with, but it may well be a game changing tool if it fulfils its prophecy as the global currency of the internet era. If it becomes that, if it becomes the gold of the digital era then the sky is the limit.

Or not. Don’t spend (like Gold, Bitcoin isnt an investment) more than you can afford to lose.

I like to see Bitcoin going up but to be honest I’m betting on it for the long run. Some people sold thinking that it peaked at $1000, then at $2000, Then $3000 and so on.  Like precious metals, but it and store it for that rainy day.

My advice remains. When funds allow it, buy a bit of precious metal here and there, same for some actual cash for a rainy day because cash is still king, and also put some in Bitcoin every now and then.

Enjoy the weekend folks.

FerFAL

Fernando “FerFAL” Aguirre is the author of “The Modern Survival Manual: Surviving the Economic Collapse” and “Bugging Out and Relocating: When Staying is not an Option”

WWII French Resistance Weapons Cache Unearthed

Ammo, grenades, three Sten submachine guns and several magazines, about five for each Sten. There’s also two auto pistols and a revolver. Nice French Resistance cache, recently found by a couple in in the Quarré-les-Tombes area, France.

There’s the saying though, that when its time to burry your guns you really should be digging them up. Yet these guns were not found by the enemy and could have been dug up to fight if/when needed. Maybe they were cached again after doing just that.

I still think it’s pretty interesting how successful caching can actually be.

Of course doing it properly with modern supplies, PVC pipes or sealed polymer gun cases, well oiled guns for protection and who knows how long a good cache can last.

FerFAL

Fernando “FerFAL” Aguirre is the author of “The Modern Survival Manual: Surviving the Economic Collapse” and “Bugging Out and Relocating: When Staying is not an Option”

Lessons learned from the Puerto Rico Disaster: Cash and knowing when to Bug Out

Dear FERFAL: Have you keeping up with the Puerto Rico disaster?.

Lesson learned:

1) Bug out

2) Have a lot of liquid assets available (Cash)

3) Generator, runs out of fuel, then you have hundreds of thousands of individuals with the same problem!

4) You can’t have enough food or water.

5) You may think that you’re prepared, but nearly a meter (39 inches, for my fellow Americans)of rain change all that. Look at number one.

6) In one evening your back in the early 1900.

7) Save your money for bugging out.

8) Just bug out!.

I’ll keep you posted.

-Maria

..

Hello Maria, thanks for those points.

Not surprised to see you mention and insist on the importance of cash and bugging out to safety.

These are essentially the two biggest points during these worst case scenarios. Supplies are important, food, WATER, generator, fuel, but when that water keeps raising and destroys everything in its path you just understand your life may be the next thing you lose.

So when it comes down to it, it’s a)Bug out! And save your life and the life of your loved ones.  b) Have the cash to get back on your feet. That money is all too important for rebuilding, getting things fixed and pay for those million things you just couldn’t prepare for.

For getting ready to bug out and evacuate when these disasters hit, when you have hours, minutes or just seconds to escape, check out my book “Bugging Out and Relocating: When Staying Put is not an Option”. Floods, fires and a variety of disasters affect people that believe they have prepared, but in fact they only prepared for what they HOPED they would be facing one day rather than true disasters.

Since we’re talking cash. How important was cash in Puerto Rico? Well, it was so important that extra cash had to be rushed to meet the surge in demand. “Demand for cash is extraordinarily high right now, and will evolve as depository institutions regain power, armored car services are able to reach branches, and ATMs are once again active,” said the spokeswoman of the New York branch of the U.S. central bank.

Cash demand soars in Puerto Rico after hurricane hit ATMs, card systems

FerFAL

Fernando “FerFAL” Aguirre is the author of “The Modern Survival Manual: Surviving the Economic Collapse” and “Bugging Out and Relocating: When Staying is not an Option”